Authors need to blog – details part 3

This is part of a series “Authors Need to Blog.”  The series includes these posts:

Part 1:  You like to write; Build an audience;
Part 2:  Build your brand; Improve your writing; Start right now;
Part 3:  Market, market, market;
Part 4:  Some “but’s”;
Part 5:  A final wrap-up quote, and some excellent references to check out.

Market, market, market:

  • Blogs are an ideal marketing tool for authors.
  • Many traditional publishers no longer offer marketing assistance.  Marketing is up to you.  Not only that, but agents look for authors who already have thousands of social media followers.  A good book is not enough to attract a publisher, nowadays.
  • This common saying is absolutely true: “Writing a great book is half the job.  The other half is promoting it.”
  • Self-publishing assumes that you do your own marketing.  Your blog is the perfect platform from which to develop all your marketing efforts.
  • With a blog, your potential market is vast.  You can find readers from all over the world who are interested in your genre, and in you as author.
  • At the same time, competition has never been greater.  Did you know that in the USA alone over 1 million new books are published every year?  You must find more and innovative ways for your book (or other writing) to stand out and be noticed.
  • And you, as a writer, are competing with movies, TV, video games, radio, microblogs, endless cell-phone apps, and on and on.  You need to market in the places (primarily the internet) where your potential audience is flocking.
  • Provide a variety of ways for people to actually buy your product.  Go beyond the bookstore or personal marketing (though those are still very useful) and use the new media techniques like blogging about your book, selling it from your own author site, selling it from online bookstores like Amazon, selling it in new forms like e-books.
  • And use innovative, entertaining methods on your site, like polls or contests (choose a cover for your book; win a free copy of the book; etc).  Get others involved and interested in your writing.
  • Promote you book specifically.  Have a special page where you can feature photos, your book trailer, downloads of excerpts, interviews, reviews, giveaways, etc.
  • If book tours and other hands-on methods are difficult for you because of other situations in your life, with a blog you can still successfully market your book outside your local area.
  • Use your blog to let your readers know about upcoming events.  Have lots of customers lining up at all the cities and towns to which you take your next book-reading-and-signing tour.
  • The marketing you do online supports and gives you ideas for your offline marketing – and vice versa.  Check out other author blogs to see what they are doing too.
  • Perhaps share some of your marketing tips on your blog.  You’ll come to be regarded as not just a writer, but also as a go-to person in the marketing field.  You could end up with requests for articles, guest blog posts, speaking engagements and other income-producing and brand-building opportunities.  Do the same for all aspects of your writing and publishing endeavors.

Question of the day:  How have you marketed your book in the past?  What have you learned from this article that you can add to your marketing efforts?

Tip of the day:  Don’t just read tips.  Get busy and put your plans into action!

Put it into action:  Right now, add to your author’s blog binder ideas from today’s post that you can use to market your books and increase your readership.

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